Frozen Blackberries Sold At Kroger May Contain Hepatitis A Virus

June 08, 2019 - 9:50 am
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DETROIT (WWJ) - It's time to check your freezer.

Kroger is recalling frozen blackberries sold under its Private Selection brand because the products may be contaminated with the Hepatitis A virus.  

Products being recalled include: 

•    PRIVATE SELECTION FROZEN TRIPLE BERRY MEDLEY, 48 OZ (BEST BY: 07-07-20; UPC: 0001111079120)
•    PRIVATE SELECTION FROZEN TRIPLE BERRY MEDLEY, 16 OZ (BEST BY: 06-19-20; UPC: 0001111087808)
•    PRIVATE SELECTION FROZEN BLACKBERRIES, 16 OZ (BEST BY: 06-19-20, 07-02-20; UPC: 0001111087809)

The berries, which have a two-year shelf life, were manufactured by Townsend Farms and sold at Kroger its other family stores across the nation.

No illnesses have been reported to date. The contamination was discovered by the FDA as a part of an ongoing frozen berry sampling assignment. An investigation is continuing to determine whether other products are implicated.

Contact your healthcare provider if you think you may have become ill from eating frozen blackberries, or if you believe that you have eaten any of the frozen blackberry products noted above within the last two weeks.

The FDA is advising consumers not to eat and to throw away frozen fruit purchased from Kroger and other retail locations packaged under Kroger’s “Private Selection” brand. If you have the affected berries, return the packaging to the store for a refund.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that results from exposure to the Hepatitis A virus. It can range from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious illness lasting several months. Illness generally occurs within 15 to 50 days of exposure and includes fatigue, abdominal pain, jaundice, abnormal liver tests, dark urine and pale stool. Hepatitis A vaccination can prevent illness if given within two weeks of exposure. In rare cases, particularly consumers who have a pre-existing severe illness or are immune compromised, Hepatitis A infection can progress to liver failure.

The Hepatitis A virus is found in the stool and blood of people who are infected. It is spread when someone ingests the virus, usually through person-to-person contact or from eating contaminated food or drink. Contamination of food with the virus can happen at any point: growing, harvesting, processing, handling, and even after cooking.

Customers with questions can contact Kroger at 1-800-KROGERS.