laws

From left, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, hold a news conference to discuss the "Emmett Till Antilynching Act" which would designate lynching as a hate crime under federal law, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2020. Emmett Till, pictured at right, was a 14-year-old African-American who was lynched in Mississippi in 1955, after being accused of offending a white woman in her family's grocery store. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Associated Press
February 26, 2020 - 2:36 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sixty-five years after 14-year-old Emmett Till was lynched in Mississippi, Congress has approved legislation designating lynching as a hate crime under federal law. The bill, introduced by Illinois Rep. Bobby Rush and named after Till, comes 120 years after Congress first...
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In this Feb. 6, 2020, photo, a Clean Colorado highway sign sponsored by the Northern Lights Cannabis Co. is displayed on eastbound 6th Avenue west of Sheridan Blvd. in Denver. (Andy Cross/The Denver Post via AP)
Associated Press
February 18, 2020 - 9:28 am
DENVER (AP) — Cannabis companies are using a loophole in Colorado's strict limits on marijuana advertising by sponsoring state highways and putting their names on roadside signs. Currently, 51 cannabis dispensaries, cultivators, manufacturers and edible producers sponsor roadways throughout the...
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Democratic presidential candidate and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks during a campaign rally at the Buffalo Soldier Museum in Houston, Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020. Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner stands at right. (Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)
Associated Press
February 14, 2020 - 1:54 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook has decided to let political campaigns pay online influencers to spread their messages, a practice that had sidestepped many of the social network's rules governing political ads. Friday's policy reversal highlights difficulties tech companies and regulators have in...
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In this Monday, July 29, 2019, photo, a passerby uses a mobile phone while entering a subway station, in Boston. An anti-robocalls measure signed into law late Monday, Dec. 30, 2019, by President Donald Trump should help reduce the torrent of unwanted calls promising lower interest rates or pretending to be the IRS, though it won't make all such calls disappear. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
Associated Press
December 31, 2019 - 10:38 am
NEW YORK (AP) — An anti-robocalls measure signed into law Monday by President Donald Trump should help reduce the torrent of unwanted calls promising lower interest rates or pretending to be the IRS, though it won't make all such calls disappear. The new law gives authorities more enforcement...
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FILE - This Aug. 28, 2017 file photo shows cigarettes displayed on a store shelf in New York. With a new law enacted in December 2019, anyone under 21 can no longer legally buy cigarettes, cigars or any other tobacco products in the U.S. It also applies to electronic cigarettes and vaping products that heat a liquid containing nicotine. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
Associated Press
December 27, 2019 - 3:59 pm
Anyone under 21 can no longer legally buy cigarettes, cigars or any other tobacco products in the U.S. The new law enacted last week by Congress also applies to electronic cigarettes and vaping products that heat a liquid containing nicotine. The provision raising the legal limit from 18 to 21...
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Pope Francis celebrates a Mass for the Philippine community of Rome, in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican to Sunday, Dec. 15, 2019. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
Associated Press
December 17, 2019 - 12:30 pm
VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis abolished the use of the Vatican's highest level of secrecy in clergy sexual abuse cases Tuesday, responding to mounting criticism that the rule of “pontifical secrecy" has been used to protect pedophiles, silence victims and prevent police from investigating crimes...
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FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2014, file photo, a man smokes a cigarette on Main Street in Westminster, Mass. Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker is expected to sign a law on Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2019, banning sales of flavored tobacco and vaping products, including menthol cigarettes. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola), File
Associated Press
November 27, 2019 - 3:32 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts became the first state to ban flavored tobacco and nicotine vaping products, including menthol cigarettes, after Republican Gov. Charlie Baker signed into law on Wednesday a bill that’s meant to reduce the appeal of the products to young people amid a rash of illnesses...
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October 16, 2019 - 3:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is trying to sort out whether states can prosecute immigrants who use fake Social Security numbers to get a job. The justices heard arguments Wednesday in Kansas' appeal of a state court ruling that threw out three convictions after concluding the state was...
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In this Nov. 14, 2018 photo, East Hampton, Conn., Police Chief Dennis Woessner addresses the Town Council in East Hampton. Chief Woessner has concluded that an officer's membership in a far-right group infamous for engaging in violent clashes at political rallies didn't violate any department policies. Woessner said that officer Kevin P. Wilcox is no longer associated with the Proud Boys group. (Jeff Mill/The Middletown Press via AP)
October 15, 2019 - 6:43 pm
A Connecticut police officer's membership in the Proud Boys, a far-right group known for engaging in violent clashes at political rallies, didn't violate department policies, the town's police chief has concluded in response to a civil rights group's concerns. The East Hampton officer, Kevin P...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019, file photo, Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks at a news conference in Sacramento, Calif. Newsom has signed a law giving child sexual assault victims more time to file lawsuits. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
October 13, 2019 - 10:35 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California is giving childhood victims of sexual abuse more time to decide whether to file lawsuits, joining several states in expanding the statute of limitations for victims over warnings from school districts that the new rules could bankrupt them. The law signed Sunday...
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