Medical research

WWJ News
October 18, 2019 - 10:17 am
An X-ray of the package revealed a human-like shape, according to U.S. customs agents.
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A firefighter walks near the entrance to NuStar Energy fuel storage facility Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019 after a Tuesday fire in Crockett, Calif. Officials were trying to determine Wednesday if a 4.5 magnitude earthquake triggered an explosion at a fuel storage facility in the San Francisco Bay Area that started a fire and trapped thousands in their homes for hours because of potentially unhealthy air. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
October 16, 2019 - 8:20 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Officials were trying to determine Wednesday if a 4.5 magnitude earthquake triggered an explosion at a fuel storage facility in the San Francisco Bay Area that started a fire and kept thousands of people in their homes for hours because of potentially unhealthy air. The...
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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, and former Vice President Joe Biden hug during a Democratic presidential primary debate hosted by CNN/New York Times at Otterbein University, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2019, in Westerville, Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
WWJ News
October 16, 2019 - 10:35 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Health care memo to Democrats: There's more than one way to get to coverage for all. A study out Wednesday finds that an approach similar to the plan from former Vice President Joe Bide n can deliver about the same level of coverage as the government-run "Medicare for All" plan...
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Leslie Begay, left, speaks with U.S. Rep. Deb Haaland, D-New Mexico, in a hallway outside a congressional field hearing in Albuquerque, N.M., highlighting the atomic age's impact on Native American communities on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. Begay, a former uranium miner on the Navajo Nation with lung problems, says there are lingering injustices and health problems on his reservation decades after mines closed. An Indian Health Service official cited federal research at the hearing that she says showed some Navajo women, males and babies who were part of the study had high levels of uranium in their systems. (AP Photo/Mary Hudetz)
October 07, 2019 - 10:30 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — About a quarter of Navajo women and some infants who were part of a federally funded study on uranium exposure had high levels of the radioactive metal in their systems, decades after mining for Cold War weaponry ended on their reservation, a U.S. health official Monday...
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In this Sept. 9, 2019 photo, Emmanuel Bizimana holds 2-year-old Blessing, whose mother, Sandrine Umwungeri, passed away recently, as a health worker conducts a "verbal autopsy" in Kigali, Rwanda. Increasingly health officials worldwide are trusting these tools, which are analyzed by computer algorithms, to learn more about global course of human disease. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
October 06, 2019 - 12:26 am
KIGALI, Rwanda (AP) — One afternoon last month, a young woman with a tablet computer sat next to Alphonsine Umurerwa on the living room couch, asking questions, listening carefully. She learned that the woman's 23-year-old daughter, Sandrine Umwungeri, had been very sick for about a year, gradually...
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In this Sept. 9, 2019 photo, Emmanuel Bizimana holds 2-year-old Blessing, whose mother, Sandrine Umwungeri, passed away recently, as a health worker conducts a "verbal autopsy" in Kigali, Rwanda. Increasingly health officials worldwide are trusting these tools, which are analyzed by computer algorithms, to learn more about global course of human disease. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
October 01, 2019 - 9:03 am
KIGALI, Rwanda (AP) — One afternoon last month, a young woman with a tablet computer sat next to Alphonsine Umurerwa on the living room couch, asking questions, listening carefully. She learned that the woman's 23-year-old daughter, Sandrine Umwungeri, had been very sick for about a year, gradually...
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In this Monday, Oct. 1, 2018 file photo, a shop owner reaches into a drink display refrigerator at his convenience store in Kent, Wash. A study on America’s eating habits released on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2019 shows only slight improvement from 1999 to 2016. While adults cut down a bit on added sugars and ate marginally more whole grains, they still eat too many sweetened foods and unhealthy fats. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
September 24, 2019 - 11:31 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Americans' diets are a little less sweet and a little crunchier but there's still too much sugar, white bread and artery-clogging fat, a study suggests. Overall, the authors estimated there was a modest improvement over 16 years on the government's healthy eating index, from...
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September 19, 2019 - 11:20 am
The U.S. government will spend $3 million to find out if marijuana can relieve pain, but none of the money will be used to study the part of the plant that gets people high. Nine research grants announced Thursday are for work on CBD, the trendy ingredient showing up in cosmetics and foods, and...
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FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2018 file photo, a doctor performs an ultrasound scan on a pregnant woman at a hospital in Chicago. A new study released Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, suggests when a pregnant woman breathes in air pollution, it can travel beyond her lungs to the placenta that guards her fetus. During pregnancy, particle pollution is linked to premature births and low birth weight, but scientists don’t understand why. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford, File)
September 17, 2019 - 11:18 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study suggests when a pregnant woman breathes in air pollution, it can travel beyond her lungs to the placenta that guards her fetus. Pollution composed of tiny particles from car exhaust, factory smokestacks and other sources is dangerous to everyone's health, and during...
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This 2011 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control shows HIV virions. On Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019, scientists are reporting the first use of the gene-editing tool CRISPR to try to cure a patient's HIV infection by providing blood cells that have been altered to resist the AIDS virus. (Maureen Metcalfe, Tom Hodge/CDC via AP)
September 11, 2019 - 5:03 pm
Scientists are reporting the first use of the gene-editing tool CRISPR to try to cure a patient's HIV infection by providing blood cells that were altered to resist the AIDS virus. The gene-editing tool has long been used in research labs, and a Chinese scientist was scorned last year when he...
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